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Nov 08, 2004

PierPass extended gate hours will be implemented on an accelerated

Jul 13, 2011

OffPeak Gates and the Local Economy

First conceived of as an initiative to mitigate traffic congestion and reduce pollution in and around the Ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach, the PierPass OffPeak program evolves over the past six years to serve as a major contributor of jobs throughout San Pedro Bay.

First conceived of as an initiative to mitigate traffic congestion and reduce pollution in and around the Ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach, the PierPass OffPeak program evolves over the past six years to serve as a major contributor of jobs throughout San Pedro Bay.

Sep 09, 2014

PierPass Announces Free-Flow Program to Speed Cargo Through Ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach

Online Edition

LONG BEACH, Calif.--()--PierPass Inc. today launched the Free-Flow Program, testing a new cargo-handling process expected to significantly reduce the time it takes participating trucks to pick up containers at marine terminals.

“How congested would LAX or JFK be if every taxi came for one specific person rather than picking up the first in line? That’s how the current container cargo system works.”

Today’s random-access process – where any truck can show up at any time to pick up any container – hasn’t changed since containerization began in the early 1960’s. With new, larger ships unloading as many as 5,000 containers at a time, the random-access process is creating efficiency challenges at major ports around the world.

Online Edition

LONG BEACH, Calif.--()--PierPass Inc. today launched the Free-Flow Program, testing a new cargo-handling process expected to significantly reduce the time it takes participating trucks to pick up containers at marine terminals.

Mar 03, 2017

How new Southern California air cleanup plan could affect warehouses, ports

Online Edition

An earlier version of this report incorrectly described which board members voted against the plan. The corrected version is below.

Southern California air quality officials approved a 15-year pollution clean-up plan Friday, March 3, after adding provisions that would eventually eliminate a pollution-credits marketplace that regulates emissions from oil refineries and other major smokestack polluters.

But the 11-2 vote by the South Coast Air Quality Management District board left intact controversial plans for pollution reduction from the region's ports and warehouse centers to be achieved through voluntary compliance with industry.

The board majority rejected provisions sought by new member Sheila Kuehl, a Los Angeles County supervisor, that would have required district staff to develop port and warehouse rules that the board could put in place should volunteer efforts fall short.

Kuehl, however, succeeded at adding provisions to the plan that will have the board seek state authority to impose rules requiring public agencies to use near-zero and zero emission trucks.

She also won plans for tougher rules to cut pollution from airports.

"You win few and lose a few, but you move in the right direction," Kuehl said to the cheers of Sierra Club members just outside the air district offices in Diamond Bar.

The plan will serve as a blueprint for future regulations designed to meet the federal health standard for ozone, the hallmark pollutant of summer smog. While the region has made great progress in the past 40 years in reducing air pollution, lung-searing ozone, a product of vehicle and smokestack emissions, remains a consistent problem. Last year, ozone pollution exceeded federal standards during 132 days.

The district regulates air pollution in the ocean-to-mountains air basin over Orange County and the urban portions of Los Angeles, Riverside, and San Bernardino counties.

Most board members opposed the tougher stance on the ports and warehouses proposed by Kuehl.

Janice Rutherford, a San Bernardino County supervisor, said warehouses fall under the land-use authority of cities and counties. She contends that the air district would be overstepping its jurisdiction if it imposed regulations for such facilities.

Such regulations also would hurt job creation in the Inland Empire in the logistics sector, she said.

"This industry is getting people out of poverty and into the middle class," Rutherford said.

The board voted 7-6 for a provision sought by Judith Mitchell, a Rolling Hills Estates councilwoman, that sets goals and deadlines to a plan to eliminate the pollution credit market for the region's oil refineries, power plants and larger factories.

It calls for these facilities to cut nitrogen dioxide emissions by five tons by 2025, and would replace the marketplace with direct pollution control rules "as soon as practicable."

Online Edition

An earlier version of this report incorrectly described which board members voted against the plan. The corrected version is below.

Southern California air quality officials approved a 15-year pollution clean-up plan Friday, March 3, after adding provisions that would eventually eliminate a pollution-credits marketplace that regulates emissions from oil refineries and other major smokestack polluters.

Oct 01, 2016

Why Southern California officials are skeptical over smog-reduction strategy

Online Edition

 

As the worst smog season in years winds down, new doubts appear to cloud a costly strategy broached three months ago by Southern California’s regional air quality agency to bring air pollution levels down to healthful levels.

In late June, the newly hired top administrator for the South Coast Air Quality Management District proposed a clean-up plan that could cost as much as $1 billion a year for years to come by providing truck fleet owners and other polluters financial incentives to acquire cleaner operating machines.

But no clear way to cover the cost has emerged and the air seems to be getting worse. Most days this summer failed to meet the federal health standard for lung-searing ozone in Southern California’s ocean-to-mountain air basin.

So far this year, pollution levels exceeded the health standard during 128 days – making 2016 the worst smog season in at least four years. During July and August, only two days met the health standard for ozone. Air district officials have blamed a summer of hot, stagnant weather that traps pollution in the air basin.

Life has been tougher for many people with respiratory conditions.

“We definitely had a lot of summer asthma cases,” Dr. Sunil Saini, who operates asthma and allergy clinics in Upland, Fontana and San Dimas. “And it’s not just asthma, but also a lot of allergy and sinus cases, and I think it was because of the air pollution.”

In June, Wayne Nastri, the air district’s acting executive officer, said that Congress could create a “clean air investment and clean-up fund,” which would be similar to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Superfund used to clean up polluted industrial sites and groundwater contamination.

Nastri was an official for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency under President George W. Bush. He took the helm of the air district’s staff in April shortly after a new Republican majority took control of the district governing board. The GOP majority, saying they wanted a business-friendly approach to smog clean-up strategies, voted to fire longtime Executive Officer Barry Wallerstein.

A TOUGH SELL

Air district officials have since acknowledged they have made no progress on the congressional-fund effort.

But they have floated the idea of increasing annual vehicle registration fees paid by air district residents by $30 to $60 per car. That would require a two-thirds majority vote of the state Legislature, because it would be considered a new tax.

The idea is not unprecedented. Residents in eight counties in the San Joaquin Valley pay an additional $12 in registration fees that raises $29 million a year for their regional air district.

In Southern California, a $60 increase could raise as much as $800 million a year, said William A. Burke, chairman of the air board, during a Sept. 9, public meeting at air district headquarters in Diamond Bar.

“At that point, you are about finished,” he said about raising money needed for the incentives. But he said he received a cold response from both business and environment groups.

“Nobody wants to pay $60,” he noted at the meeting.

The idea of hiking vehicle registration fees to pay for pollution-reduction incentives has been opposed by both Republican and Democratic state lawmakers.

“A lot of Californians are scraping by and they can’t afford it,” said Assemblywoman Melissa Melendez, R-Lake Elsinore. “I will lead the charge in shooting that one down,” she said.

Higher registration fees would encourage people to hang onto older, higher polluting cars and discourage then from buying cleaner new cars, which have higher registration fees, Melendez said in a telephone interview.

State Senate leader Kevin de León, D-Los Angeles, also panned the idea, saying in a statement that polluters should pay for emission reductions – not people and communities burdened by air pollution.

 

 

Online Edition

 

As the worst smog season in years winds down, new doubts appear to cloud a costly strategy broached three months ago by Southern California’s regional air quality agency to bring air pollution levels down to healthful levels.

In late June, the newly hired top administrator for the South Coast Air Quality Management District proposed a clean-up plan that could cost as much as $1 billion a year for years to come by providing truck fleet owners and other polluters financial incentives to acquire cleaner operating machines.

Aug 25, 2011

Riverside Officials Drop Lawsuits Against Expansion Projects LA Area Ports

Riverside officials decide to drop their lawsuits against expansion projects at Los Angeles-area ports after 2 ½ years of slogging through the courts and at least $350,000 in legal costs.

Riverside officials decide to drop their lawsuits against expansion projects at Los Angeles-area ports after 2 ½ years of slogging through the courts and at least $350,000 in legal costs.

Feb 16, 2015

California citrus exports hurt by West Coast labor dispute

Online Edition

California’s citrus growers – including Inland producers – already grappling with a fourth year of drought say their exports are taking a hit from a labor dispute at West Coast seaports.

Daryl Perricone, general manager, California Citrus Cooperative, Riverside, said the labor dispute seems to be hitting citrus shippers more now than before.

“We have had fruit that will load here one day, than sit in the port for two weeks before it ships,” he said. “We’ve had times where fruit has taken 60 days to get to Malaysia, whereas a normal transit is 30 days.”

The cooperative, which handles citrus from about 70 groves in Kern, Riverside and San Bernardino counties, normally ships 15 to 22 loads of oranges from the port, Perricone said. About 58,000 pounds of fruit is shipped per load.

Perricone said he just took a call that fruit the cooperative sent out on Jan. 20 arrived in Shanghai in about 15 days. “The boats, once they get out on the water, are hauling.”

Dollar-wise, Perricone said the cooperative has not yet been affected. Right now, the biggest hurdle is having enough cooler space to stage shipments.

If the port shuts down, that’s another matter, he said, and explained: “We’d have to stop harvesting.”

Al Bates, president of Sun Pacific Shippers and Farming, told the San Francisco Chronicle that growers like him are exporting half of their normal fruit produce to places such as Korea, Japan and China. A leading grower of citrus in the Central Valley, Bates blames the ongoing disputes at the seaports for crippling the flow of his goods.

“You shouldn’t be able to hold an industry hostage,” Bates said. “There’s got to be some way that we can continue to operate while they negotiate.”

The labor dispute has impacted 29 seaports along the West Coast, including Long Beach, Los Angeles and Oakland. The White House said on Saturday that President Barack Obama is sending Labor Secretary Tom Perez to California in an attempt to reach a deal at the bargaining table. The concern is that the slow movement of goods through the seaports will inflict broad economic damage.

Online Edition

California’s citrus growers – including Inland producers – already grappling with a fourth year of drought say their exports are taking a hit from a labor dispute at West Coast seaports.

Mar 28, 2008

Newport Would Cost $2.3 Billion

A study by the N.C. State Port Authority estimates cost of $2.3 billion to build major new port in Brunswick County, a figure dwarfed by annual payroll of 500,000 new jobs by 2030 projected at $10.5 billion annual payroll.

A study by the N.C. State Port Authority estimates cost of $2.3 billion to build major new port in Brunswick County, a figure dwarfed by annual payroll of 500,000 new jobs by 2030 projected at $10.5 billion annual payroll.

Nov 23, 2011

Final Rule Banning Hand-Held Cell Phone

U.S. Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood announces final rule specifically prohibiting interstate truck and bus drivers from using hand-held cell phones while operating their vehicles. The joint rule from the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) and the Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA) is the latest action by the U.S. Department of Transportation to end distracted driving.

U.S. Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood announces final rule specifically prohibiting interstate truck and bus drivers from using hand-held cell phones while operating their vehicles. The joint rule from the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) and the Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA) is the latest action by the U.S. Department of Transportation to end distracted driving.

Jan 07, 2010

AET affords first 100% FDI in shipping for India

Foreign direct investments begin to flow into the Indian shipping sector commencing with American Eagle Tankers’ flagging in their first vessel under the Indian registry. This comes almost a decade after the government having permitted 100% FDI in shipping. The New Year brings in good news not only for the Indian maritime trade but also for American Eagle Tankers (AET).

Foreign direct investments begin to flow into the Indian shipping sector commencing with American Eagle Tankers’ flagging in their first vessel under the Indian registry. This comes almost a decade after the government having permitted 100% FDI in shipping. The New Year brings in good news not only for the Indian maritime trade but also for American Eagle Tankers (AET).