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May 29, 2008

US rail network facing congestion 'calamity'

Railway executives warned that the industry could face severe congestion problems by year 2035. The 140,000-mile rail network devoted to carrying everything from cars to grain by freight is already groaning under the strain of congestion, with trains forced to stand aside for hours because of one-track rail lines. The problem on the shared tracks has worsened in recent years as freight traffic has soared. Passenger trains move much faster than most freight trains, and in many areas there is only a single track, forcing trains to pull over onto side tracks and wait while trains coming in the other direction pass.

Railway executives warned that the industry could face severe congestion problems by year 2035. The 140,000-mile rail network devoted to carrying everything from cars to grain by freight is already groaning under the strain of congestion, with trains forced to stand aside for hours because of one-track rail lines. The problem on the shared tracks has worsened in recent years as freight traffic has soared.

May 06, 2008

EModal trucker check data registry in Philadelphia

Greenwich Terminals LLC operators of Packer Avenue Marine Terminal, Philadelphia has announced gate enhancements using eModal Trucker Check for its marine terminal gates. Effective June 2, 2008, trucking companies, their trucks and drivers must be registered in eModal Trucker Check, a national data truck registry, for access onto its terminal.

Greenwich Terminals LLC operators of Packer Avenue Marine Terminal, Philadelphia has announced gate enhancements using eModal Trucker Check for its marine terminal gates. Effective June 2, 2008, trucking companies, their trucks and drivers must be registered in eModal Trucker Check, a national data truck registry, for access onto its terminal.

Apr 23, 2010

Teamsters Mislead Press on Effects of Port of Los Angeles

The American Trucking Associations' (ATA) lawsuit against the Port of Los Angeles that went to trial does not threaten the Clean Truck Program at the Port of Los Angeles. Contrary to claims from the Teamsters union and its front group, the Coalition for Clean and Safe Ports, the lawsuit challenges only concession requirements that the Port of Los Angeles has never implemented, including a ban on independent owner-operators.

The American Trucking Associations' (ATA) lawsuit against the Port of Los Angeles that went to trial does not threaten the Clean Truck Program at the Port of Los Angeles. Contrary to claims from the Teamsters union and its front group, the Coalition for Clean and Safe Ports, the lawsuit challenges only concession requirements that the Port of Los Angeles has never implemented, including a ban on independent owner-operators.

May 08, 2008

DHS extends final TWIC implementation date to April 15, 2009

The U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) has set a new compliance deadline of April 15, 2009, rather than September 25, 2008. Trucking companies, drivers, mariners, port workers and other personnel now have seven months to obtain their Transportation Worker Identification Credential.

The U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) has set a new compliance deadline of April 15, 2009, rather than September 25, 2008. Trucking companies, drivers, mariners, port workers and other personnel now have seven months to obtain their Transportation Worker Identification Credential.

May 15, 2007

Pport of Long Beach receives $4.6 million in federal security

Feb 21, 2007

Senators introduce legislation targeting exhaust emission from trucks; new standards

Jan 18, 2006

The Los Angeles/Long Beach/Santa Ana area is ranked 3rd in

Jul 15, 2015

Average LA-LB truck turn times hit hour and a half

Online Edition

 

Harbor truckers in Los Angeles-Lon Beach are accepting the fact that, atleast for the moment, turn times are stuck at about 90 minutes, when a little over a year ago average turn times in the largest U.S. port complex were about one hour.

The reason for this grudging acceptance of a 50 percent degradation in turn times is that harbor drayage rates have gone up, and on top of the higher rates, many trucking companies have succeeded in getting customers to pay for waiting times at congested marine terminals.

 

"Because of the port congestion the past year, the industry for the first time has gotten creative with rates and driver pay. That's the silver lining," said Weston La Bar, executive director of the Harbor Trucking Association of Southern California.

 

The trucking association tracks turn times on a daily basis at each of the 13 container terminals in Los Angeles-Long Beach, and each month publishes the numbers. The latest numbers, for June, show 93 as the minutes average turn time for all 13 terminals, with the median visit time being 76 minutes. About 37.6 percent of the visits took less than one hour, 36.4 percent between one and two hours and 26.1 percent of the visits lasted more than two hours.

 

That performance is dismal compared to just one year ago. HTA's numbers going back 20 months show that from October 2013 through March 2014, average turn times each month ranged from 60 to 70 minutes and the percentage of moves taking longer than two hours ranged from 15 to 23 percent. Turn times in excess of two hours are a killer for port productivity and cause drivers, most of whom are paid by the trip, to lose money.

 

Much has happened since April 2014 to wreak havoc on trucker turn times. After being close to one hour from October 2013 to March 2014, turn times suddenly jumped to 78 minutes in April and kept climbing through October 2014. That was the period when Los Angeles-Long Beach began to experience congestion due to chassis shortages and intermodal rail service problem.

 

The next big spike in turn times occurred in November 2014 when the International Longshore and Warehouse Union slashed the number of skilled yard crane operators it dispatched each day to 35 from 110. That job action, which was designed to give the ILWU leverage in its coastwide contract negotiations with the Pacific Maritime Association, caused the average turn time to spike to 112 minutes. The yard crane operators deliver containers from the stacks to truckers that enter the terminals.

 

With the resolution of a tentative coastwide contract on Feb. 20, and ratification of the agreement by the ILWU and PMA in late May, congestion has steadily diminished. However, truck turn times appear to be stuck at about 90 minutes with no immediate hope for relief.

While this new normal is certainly not a good normal, La Bar said the harbor trucking community in Southern California is learning to live with it, as long as the higher freight rates negotiated during the period of extreme congestion do not drop, and as long as customers continue to pay for excess waiting times.

 

"We definitely want to get back to 60 minutes, but so long as the industry stays (financially) healthy, we can live with 90 minutes," he said.

 

The improved financial conditions are producing a residual effect in that harbor trucking companies are able to hold on to more drivers now. The trucking industry nationwide has an exceptionally high turnover rate, but when drivers are properly compensated, they are less likely to look elsewhere for work, such as in the resurgent construction industry.

 

 

La Bar said that a driver-training program HTA runs with Long Beach City College has been doing quite well of late. Classes are full, and most graduates are finding immediate employment in the harbor. Programs such as this are critical to the future of the industry because the average age of drivers is getting dangerously close to the "age cliff" where there won't be enough young drivers available to replace those that are retiring, he said.

 

Despite these silver linings, the industry stakeholder groups that the two ports have formed to address important issues such as truck turn times must find a way to eventually get the average times back to about one hour, La Bar said. This is especially true now because each year the average size of the vessels calling in Los Angeles-Long Beach gets larger.

 

A recent study by PIERS, a sister product of JOC.com within IHS Maritime & Trade, stated that vessels calling in Los Angeles-Long Beach generate an average of more than 5,000 container moves per visit, far more than at any other port in the world. New York-New Jersey is second in that metric. The two largest U.S. port complexes also experience more congestion problems than other ports, so it is obvious that the mega-ports have still not developed the processes needed to handle today's big ships.

Contact Bill Mongelluzzo at bill.mongelluzzo@ihs.com and follow him on Twitter: @billmongelluzzo.

Online Edition

 

Harbor truckers in Los Angeles-Lon Beach are accepting the fact that, atleast for the moment, turn times are stuck at about 90 minutes, when a little over a year ago average turn times in the largest U.S. port complex were about one hour.

Feb 15, 2006

Panama Canal Authority has initiated new drill barge. This will

Nov 14, 2005

Heavy-Duty Vehicle Idling Emission Reduction Program

October 20, 2005, the Air Resources Board approves a regulatory measure to further reduce emissions of toxic and criteria pollutants by limiting idling of new and in-use sleeper berth equiped diesel trucks.

October 20, 2005, the Air Resources Board approves a regulatory measure to further reduce emissions of toxic and criteria pollutants by limiting idling of new and in-use sleeper berth equiped diesel trucks.

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