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Oct 13, 2009

Advanced spectroscopic portal radiation detection monitors

US Customs and Border Protection (CBP)and other agencies have used detection devices for years to detect and intercept illicit nuclear material being shipped across our national borders. Following September 11, 2001, radiation portal monitors were purchased in large numbers and deployed at seaports, airports, and land ports of entry. Everyone was aware that these devices had shortcomings and could not reliably detect shielded nuclear material, but they were the best then available. Companies that constructed such devices promised that they were close to perfecting the next generation of the device, which acquired the name: Advanced Spectroscopic Portal Radiation Detection Monitor or ASP.

US Customs and Border Protection (CBP)and other agencies have used detection devices for years to detect and intercept illicit nuclear material being shipped across our national borders. Following September 11, 2001, radiation portal monitors were purchased in large numbers and deployed at seaports, airports, and land ports of entry. Everyone was aware that these devices had shortcomings and could not reliably detect shielded nuclear material, but they were the best then available.

Oct 28, 2010

JECKU: Global Shipbuilding Leaders Address Challenges

One hundred and twenty leading executives from the major shipyards from Japan, Europe, China, Korea and the U.S. (JECKU) hold a conference to exchange views on global economic development, supply and demand prospects as well as important technological and regulatory developments to improve the environmental performance of ships.

One hundred and twenty leading executives from the major shipyards from Japan, Europe, China, Korea and the U.S. (JECKU) hold a conference to exchange views on global economic development, supply and demand prospects as well as important technological and regulatory developments to improve the environmental performance of ships.

Apr 16, 2010

California might act like King Canute

The IMO finally agrees to cast a 200 mile net around the US and Canada. Under the new IMO rules, vessels traveling within the 200-mile control area will have until July, 2010 of this year to use fuel with no more than 15,000 parts per million.

The IMO finally agrees to cast a 200 mile net around the US and Canada. Under the new IMO rules, vessels traveling within the 200-mile control area will have until July, 2010 of this year to use fuel with no more than 15,000 parts per million.

Aug 17, 2010

Port and City Dispute Gets Nasty

Long Beach port commissioners fight for their turf and show valiant colors in fighting off City Hall, seeing an extra proposal made by the city to transfer control of the oil production facilities within port boundaries to the city.

Long Beach port commissioners fight for their turf and show valiant colors in fighting off City Hall, seeing an extra proposal made by the city to transfer control of the oil production facilities within port boundaries to the city.

Jul 26, 2010

Why build port capacity when your market share is falling

Hong Kong’s proposed Container Terminal 10 (CT10) is not needed for a long time, but little stands in the way of pouring concrete in this city.

Hong Kong’s proposed Container Terminal 10 (CT10) is not needed for a long time, but little stands in the way of pouring concrete in this city.

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Aug 25, 2011

California Goes Awry Over Ballast Water Treatment

California's dogged determination to lead the world in cracking the whip against the maritime industry can best be described as "boldly going nowhere." The latest folly is the continuing saga over ballast water. The rules apply to vessels being built from January 2012 and carrying at least 5,000 tonnes of ballast. Shoving aside International Maritime Organization suggestions for the maximum volume of organisms in ballast water (less than 10 organisms per cubic meter for particles greater than 50 microns), California wants to dictate that there must be NO DETECTABLE LIVING (emphasis added) organisms.

California's dogged determination to lead the world in cracking the whip against the maritime industry can best be described as "boldly going nowhere." The latest folly is the continuing saga over ballast water. The rules apply to vessels being built from January 2012 and carrying at least 5,000 tonnes of ballast.

Jul 27, 2010

Latest air security requirement may be a boon for lines

Ocean carriers could be feasting on air freight from this weekend when new rules are applied in the US. From midnight on Saturday, the US Transportation Security Administration will require that all air freight carried in the bellies of passenger planes in, around and out of the US will have to have been screened.

Ocean carriers could be feasting on air freight from this weekend when new rules are applied in the US. From midnight on Saturday, the US Transportation Security Administration will require that all air freight carried in the bellies of passenger planes in, around and out of the US will have to have been screened.

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Mar 28, 2011

Liquid Bulk Operators Flee Mumbai as the Port Lacks Facility

With tank farm capacity in ports of Maharashtra state remaining stagnant, the liquid bulk trade shifts base to other states. The loss to Maharashtra state and its consumers is proving to be gain for neighboring states.

With tank farm capacity in ports of Maharashtra state remaining stagnant, the liquid bulk trade shifts base to other states. The loss to Maharashtra state and its consumers is proving to be gain for neighboring states.

Jul 19, 2010

FUSI to Agitate for Seamen's Wage Revision

FUSI threatens to agitate or strike work as a result of "growing pressures at sea."

FUSI threatens to agitate or strike work as a result of "growing pressures at sea."

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Jun 10, 2010

West coast deepens as East coast looks elsewhere

Channel deepening is all the rage among ports, with Long Beach officially starting a $40 million project to dig out 1.5 million cubic feet of material to extend the main channel to 76 feet. “We’re sending a message to our customers. We want your discretionary cargo to come back,” the city's mayor is quoted as saying.

Channel deepening is all the rage among ports, with Long Beach officially starting a $40 million project to dig out 1.5 million cubic feet of material to extend the main channel to 76 feet. “We’re sending a message to our customers. We want your discretionary cargo to come back,” the city's mayor is quoted as saying.