Searchable Goods Movement Timeline

Search Filter

Date range:
to
Date Headline Source
Feb 12, 2014

Trucking Association Calls for 24-Hour Terminal Operations

In an attempt to thin out local port traffic throughout the workday, the Harbor Trucking Association proposed opening terminals 24 hours a day instead of the constrained schedules in place. Currently, terminals are open from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. and again from 6 p.m. to 3 a.m., five days a week. Operating the terminals around the clock would dissuade trucks from blocking access roads at particular times, according to the HTA. However, terminal operators shot down the proposal citing the prohibiti

In an attempt to thin out local port traffic throughout the workday, the Harbor Trucking Association proposed opening terminals 24 hours a day instead of the constrained schedules in place. Currently, terminals are open from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. and again from 6 p.m. to 3 a.m., five days a week. Operating the terminals around the clock would dissuade trucks from blocking access roads at particular times, according to the HTA. However, terminal operators shot down the proposal citing the prohibiti

May 20, 2015

HTA Announces Two Industry Changing Programs

Online Edition

 

The Harbor Trucking Association (HTA) represents more than 100 intermodal trucking companies operating more than 6,000 trucks in California’s ports. On the heels of the worst period of port congestion to impact California seaports, the HTA is partnering with other stakeholders to help create positive change for the drayage industry in the state. “It is time to do more than identify problems, we must now start identifying solutions” said Weston Labar, Executive Director of the HTA. He continued to state “We feel in order to best serve our members and our industry, we need to do more than just be advocates. We need to make bold moves that help solve issues that our industry faces and make sure we are putting our companies and their drivers in the best opportunity to have success in this industry. The only way we can accomplish this is by thinking outside the box and partnering with other stakeholders to implement game changing programs that move our industry forward.”

Since 2013, the HTA has been partnering with Long Beach City College (LBCC) to address the truck driver shortage in the Ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach. The creation of the first driver training program formed as a collaboration between an industry association and an academic institution has resulted in the graduation of nearly 100 new truck drivers entering the industry. That success has resulted in the program receiving a $220,000 grant from Jobs for the Future and the Walmart Foundation that will allow the College to expand a training program for harbor truck drivers. A focus of the 2-year grant will be recruiting more women to join the local trucking workforce.

“Transportation and logistics are major industries in our city and vital to the economic strength of our region and nation,” said LBCC Superintendent-President Eloy Ortiz Oakley. “With this grant, Long Beach City College will be able to further strengthen our efforts to prepare our local workforce for well-paying careers in these industries. Women are severely underrepresented in the transportation industry and we hope that this effort will help increase the number of women drivers,” Oakley said.

LBCC will use the two-year grant to train 300 additional drivers in the College’s Driver Training Program, and recruit more women to the program. The grant pays for most of the cost associated with the program for qualified drivers. This program fits into a greater effort LBCC is part of called Leveraging, Integrating, Networking Coordinating Supplies (LINCS) for Supply Chain Management. This is a consortium of 9 community colleges and 3 universities who received a $24.5M grant from the Department of Labor to create 8 entry-level supply chain management certifications in partnership with the Council of Supply Chain Management Professionals. LBCC received $1.75M as its share of grant funds.

The second bold partnership from the HTA is with ChassisFinder and Trucker Chassis Connection. This partnership has come together to create an industry first association chassis pool. “The HTA Members Chassis Pool will create reliability and should help create faster turn-times for port truck drivers” said George Boyle, President of the HTA. He continued to say “The HTA Chassis Pool will also create a more affordable option for trucking companies in need of chassis.” The pool will start with 200 chassis based near the ports in the San Pedro Bay and 50 based outside the Port of Oakland. The chassis pool will grow with the increased demand from HTA members.

“We worked closely with the HTA to create Trucker Chassis Connection, which provides intermodal equipment exclusively to HTA members,” added Bill Knight of Trucker Chassis Connection. “By adding 250 chassis to ports on the West Coast – and delivering a seamless way to reserve them – we are helping resolve significant issues for truckers. We are committed to helping the trucking community move forward. Our partnership with HTA and formation of Trucker Chassis Connection is a testament to that dedication.”

HTA members can reserve this exclusive Trucker Chassis Connection pool of chassis via ChassisFinder.com, the leading chassis reservation exchange. ChassisFinder.com gives access to real-time information on chassis availability and pricing, allowing users to find and lease chassis based on location, date, quantity and type. By inputting basic information into ChassisFinder.com, HTA members can find, price and reserve chassis in less than a minute. The system delivers instant confirmation of the lease, as well as reporting tools that provide users with full transparency into lease history and chassis pick up and drop off information.

“Since 2013, ChassisFinder.com has been on the leading edge of chassis leasing, starting with our creation of the first online chassis reservation exchange,” said Chassis Finder COO Kevin Higgins, “We are thrilled to continue innovating with this new program that expands our available inventory of chassis and gives HTA members access to this exclusive resource.”

Online Edition

 

Aug 28, 2008

Clean Trucks Program - A Progress Report

Clean Trucks Program - A Progress Report with special attention to the role of PortCheck and the collection of Clean Trucks Fee. Event Canceled September 3, 2008. We apologize for any inconvenience. Please stay tuned for future meetings. If you have any questions, please call 800.993.0302 or email us at rsvp@cleantrucksprogram.com

Clean Trucks Program - A Progress Report with special attention to the role of PortCheck and the collection of Clean Trucks Fee. Event Canceled September 3, 2008. We apologize for any inconvenience. Please stay tuned for future meetings. If you have any questions, please call 800.993.0302 or email us at rsvp@cleantrucksprogram.com

Sep 26, 2005

PierPASS has accommodated 400,000 trucks in the off-peak during its

Jul 29, 2010

Broad Coalition Backs New House Green Jobs Bill to Empower

A nationwide coalition of 120 environmental, public health, labor, business, consumer advocacy, faith and community organizations today applauded Rep. Jerrold Nadler (D-NY) and 57 other House members from 15 states for introducing promising new legislation that would accelerate the speed and success of clean fleet turnover plans at U.S. seaports, lower public health costs for taxpayers, and help America’s truck drivers re-enter the ranks of the middle class.

A nationwide coalition of 120 environmental, public health, labor, business, consumer advocacy, faith and community organizations today applauded Rep. Jerrold Nadler (D-NY) and 57 other House members from 15 states for introducing promising new legislation that would accelerate the speed and success of clean fleet turnover plans at U.S. seaports, lower public health costs for taxpayers, and help America’s truck drivers re-enter the ranks of the middle class.

Jul 30, 2014

Drayage truck revised 4 month extension

On November 24, 2009, the California Air Resources Board (ARB) issued an advisory that grants a four month temporary extension for drayage trucks receiving public funding for retrofits or replacements.  This extension allows trucks awaiting a retrofit or replacement to ability to continue operation at California’s ports and rail yards until their truck is replaced or retrofitted - or April 30, 2010 – whichever comes first. 
 
This extension has been revised and updated!  
 
The revised extension now also applies to trucks awaiting privately financed replacements or retrofits.  To receive this limited four month extension until April 30, 2009, trucks owners must:
1)  Register their truck in the Drayage Truck Registry, and
2)  Complete a simple cover sheet, and
3)  Provide a copy of a purchase order or other acceptable documentation.

The extension request must be received or postmarked on or before December 31, 2009.

On November 24, 2009, the California Air Resources Board (ARB) issued an advisory that grants a four month temporary extension for drayage trucks receiving public funding for retrofits or replacements.  This extension allows trucks awaiting a retrofit or replacement to ability to continue operation at California’s ports and rail yards until their truck is replaced or retrofitted - or April 30, 2010 – whichever comes first. 
 
This extension has been revised and updated!  
 

Dec 05, 2012

L.A. ports reopen after crippling 8-day strike ends

Online Edition

Port clerks returned to work Wednesday, jubilant in the knowledge that an eight-day strike that paralyzed the nation's busiest shipping complex had won them — at least for now — guarantees that their jobs won't be outsourced to China, Arizona or other places.

The 600 clerical workers at the ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach represented by the International Longshore and Warehouse Union won only modest increases in wage and pension benefits over the life of a new four-year contract.

But more importantly, said union spokesman Craig Merrilees, they extracted promises from management that, as workers retire or leave the ports during the next four years, no more than 14 jobs will be outsourced. Companies also must continue to fill vacant positions when workers are absent for vacations or other reasons.

"The key issue in this whole strike was the outsourcing of good jobs, and they won protections against outsourcing abuses," Merrilees said.

He acknowledged that the issue would likely be front and center in negotiations when the new contract expires in 2016.

Shippers denied outsourcing jobs, but strikers insisted they had proof.

Trinnie Thompson, a union shop steward, said workers have seen invoices and emails showing some of their responsibilities being usurped by people in offices in Costa Rica, Shanghai, Colorado and Arizona.

"They take a job here in California where the average salary is $65,000 and are paying only $30,000 in a state like Arizona," she said.

The clerks handle such tasks as filing invoices and billing notices, arranging dock visits by customs inspectors, and ensuring that cargo moves off the dock quickly and gets where it's supposed to go.

The increasing computerization of such tasks, which allows them to be performed in cities far from the ocean, makes the clerks especially vulnerable, say labor experts.

"These are fairly complicated jobs, you can't just hire anybody to do them, but nevertheless they can be done from other places," said Nelson Lichtenstein, director of the Center for the Study of Work Labor and Democracy at the University of California, Santa Barbara, said Wednesday.

Moving such jobs overseas or to states that pay less, and where unionization is not as strong, is something that has been a trend in the United States for decades, he said, giving as an example large company customer call centers that have been relocated to India.

"What's remarkable about this is that the union struck, they shut down the ports and they won," he said, adding it showed what the strong labor movement that still exists in the shipping industry is capable of accomplishing.

The clerks make average salaries of $41 an hour, or about $87,000 a year. They also receive pensions and several weeks of vacation a year. Their health insurance is fully paid and includes zero doctor co-pays, giving them among the best salary and benefits packages of any blue-collar workers.

The deal, reached late Tuesday night, must still be ratified by union membership, but both sides expect that to happen in the coming weeks.

Meanwhile, gates reopened at the ports and thousands of workers got busy unloading everything from cars to clothing, and television sets to computers from ships that had been idling in the ocean. Goods were placed on trains and trucks, to be delivered across the country.

"It's going to take a few days, maybe a week or two to get back to normal," said Long Beach port spokesman Art Wong.

During negotiations, shippers fought vigorously against the job guarantees, maintaining that would force them to keep people on the payroll that weren't needed.

Ultimately, they compromised to end the devastating strike that shut down 10 of the 14 terminals at the ports and cost the region billions of dollars.

"At the end of the day, it was important to reach compromise to get people back to work, and we agree the deal will extend growth at the ports," said Steve Getzug, a spokesman for the Los Angeles/Long Beach Harbor Employers Association, which represented the shipping companies.

In just a week, the strike had begun to create concerns there would be shortages of everything from retail merchandise needed for next month's post-holiday sales to repair parts for Redbox video kiosks.

Christmas merchandise had already arrived before the strike began.

During the walkout, officials estimated roughly $760 million worth of cargo a day failed to move through the ports. Twenty ships headed to other ports in California and Mexico, while some simply didn't sail from their home ports. Still others idled at sea.

Clerical workers walked out Nov. 27 after working without a contract for 30 months.

Although the strikers numbered only about 450, thousands of dockworkers represented by a sister union refused to cross the picket lines, stalling work at the complex that handles 44 percent of all container traffic that arrives in the U.S. by sea.

The new contract calls for a $1 an hour raise immediately and another $1 an hour bump next year, with raises in the contract's third and fourth years still to be determined. Employees will also receive $4,000 lump sum payments for the 30 months they worked without a contract.

Their pension benefits will increase slightly, and their vacation and health benefits will remain unchanged.

When their contract expires in 2016, Merrilees said, they should expect to face the outsourcing issue again.

"This problem is one that's rampant across the country," he said. "It's great that port workers were able to get this problem in these ports subject to more controls, but meanwhile the impacts of outsourcing are still being felt across the country."

Online Edition

Port clerks returned to work Wednesday, jubilant in the knowledge that an eight-day strike that paralyzed the nation's busiest shipping complex had won them — at least for now — guarantees that their jobs won't be outsourced to China, Arizona or other places.

The 600 clerical workers at the ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach represented by the International Longshore and Warehouse Union won only modest increases in wage and pension benefits over the life of a new four-year contract.

May 01, 2007

Rhode Island SIB 2767 would prohibit idling for more than

May 12, 2007

Halifax Port Authority announced that it has entered into a

Jul 29, 2010

Oppose the "Clean Ports Act of 2010"

On behalf of undersigned members of the Clean and Sustainable Transportation Coalition, we urge you not to cosponsor the “Clean Ports Act of 2010” being circulated by Rep. Jerrold Nadler (D-NY). This legislation endorses a controversial, unnecessary and counterproductive change to longstanding federal trucking rules codified in the Federal Aviation Administration Authorization Act (FAAAA). If enacted, this bill could unfairly force out of the industry many hard working small businesses responsible for moving much of the nation’s international commerce.

On behalf of undersigned members of the Clean and Sustainable Transportation Coalition, we urge you not to cosponsor the “Clean Ports Act of 2010” being circulated by Rep. Jerrold Nadler (D-NY). This legislation endorses a controversial, unnecessary and counterproductive change to longstanding federal trucking rules codified in the Federal Aviation Administration Authorization Act (FAAAA). If enacted, this bill could unfairly force out of the industry many hard working small businesses responsible for moving much of the nation’s international commerce.