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Dec 23, 2016

With freight rail industry, competition is good

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A dozen or so harbor seals sun themselves on a bank of rocks on a bright autumn day. Others dive into the shallow waters nearby, looking for fish. Tufts of kelp flap above the water line, dancing with the harbor’s low current.

The scene? It isn’t the rocky coastline, far from mankind. This idyllic nature scene is just beyond Los Angeles’ outer port harbor, the nation’s busiest container port. Just around the bend, every year massive cargo ships unload $270 billion worth of goods into a vast industrial stretch built to handle the needs of the United States’ voracious consumer markets.

Once inhospitable to sea life, the Los Angeles and Long Beach ports have slowly wooed marine life to return, thanks to decades of tough environmental regulations.

“We see healthy communities,” said Kat Pricket, a biologist at the Port of Los Angeles. “We see improving communities.”

The ports’ 2013-14 survey of biodiversity shows how far they have come from decades ago, when canneries regularly dumped waste into the waters and ship mechanics toiled on engines not far from the docks.

“We are seeing fewer invasive species, higher number of biodiversity and we have seen more marine mammals,” said Justin Luedy, a biologist at the Port of Long Beach. “We see our water quality has improved, there’s lower metals and higher oxygen — those things that sustain life.”

While the outer harbor has been a refuge for sea life for years now, the dirtiest waters in the port along the inner harbor are getting cleaner.

For example: One of the report’s key findings measures the frequency of bottom-dwelling species, such as worms.

In 2008, the most common bottom-dwelling organism in the port could not tolerate the heavily polluted waters. But in the latest survey, carried out by Costa Mesa-based environmental consultants MBC Applied Environmental, scientists found a surprisingly abundant species of worm, the amphideutopus oculatus. It cannot thrive in heavy pollution.

“This discovery is a first for the harbor,” Luedy said. “It means that our water quality is improving. The health of the ecosystem is improving as well.”

So-called pollution-sensitive species made up six of the 10 most commonly found bottom-dwelling organisms found by scientists during the survey.

In all, there were more than 264 clams, snails, worms and other types of species found, along with 96 types of birds.

Both ports have attempted to foster this abundance by creating habitat for fish and other marine organisms in shallow waters and along the coastline. The survey provides clear evidence that those efforts have begun to yield results.

But there’s still work to be done. “Everything isn’t roses,” Pricket said.

“The biggest challenge now is runoff from storm drains,” said Dan Podella, director of the Southern California Marine Institute.

There are hundreds of storm drain outlets that lead into the harbor. After it rains, brake-pad dust, oil and other toxins slip out into the harbor and foul the water.

Accidental spills also are a problem. In March, two oil spills in the ports’ inner harbor blackened the waters, covered birds in goo and served as another reminder of how quickly the ports’ gains can be reversed.

Work to clean the water isn’t new. The federal Clean Water Act in 1972 signaled the beginning of decades of efforts. At the ports, a crackdown on seamen washing vessels in the harbor helped to prevent toxic chemicals from spilling into the harbors, Luedy said.

But the biggest improvements came from tougher state and local regulations on storm runoff.

“A lot of effort has been put into cleaning things up. All those things have slowly worked,” said Chris Lowe, director of Cal State Long Beach’s Shark Lab. “I have seen fish in the harbor that I would never think I would see.”

Lowe knows the harbor well. He’s visited it for more than 30 years, first as a young biologist, now as a professor and researcher.

The clearer waters have even attracted baby white sharks that take laps through the harbor, Lowe said.

Cleaner waters, Lowe said, mean more food to sustain such life.

“I am finally excited to see us make so much progress,” he said.

And it’s all around. Scientists documented an explosion of eel grass and 132 acres of kelp. In 2008, biologists counted only 80 acres of kelp.

Seals munch on kelp, just as they were probably doing on that autumn day as they dove beneath the waters where massive vessels pass.

“The main challenge will be maintaining this,” Luedy said, “and getting better water quality as we grow.”

 

 

Online Edition

A dozen or so harbor seals sun themselves on a bank of rocks on a bright autumn day. Others dive into the shallow waters nearby, looking for fish. Tufts of kelp flap above the water line, dancing with the harbor’s low current.

Aug 18, 2017

EMISSIONS AT HISTORIC LOW WHILE CARGO AT HISTORIC HIGH AT THE PORT OF LOS ANGELES

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SAN PEDRO, Calif. –  The Port of Los Angeles achieved record clean air gains while moving more cargo than ever, according to the Port’s 2016 Inventory of Air Emissions. Released today, the annual report also shows the Port surpassed its 2020 goal for reducing the health risk of emissions from port-related activity.

“Our ports are the engines that power our economy, and they can also be the forces that drive our region toward a greener, healthier future,” said Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti. “These outstanding results are a powerful demonstration of how we can continue making our air cleaner even as we move record amounts of cargo at the Port — and I’ll keep pushing for continued progress toward the goal of zero emissions goods movement at the ports.”

“The 2016 report validates the benefit of our clean air strategies in combination with improved operational efficiency,” said Port of Los Angeles Executive Director Gene Seroka. “We’re proud of the extraordinary progress we’ve made reducing emissions since 2006, and we’re determined to do more in the years ahead.”

Calendar year 2016 marked the Port’s highest reduction of all key pollutants. Since the Port’s baseline inventory in 2005, diesel particulate matter (DPM) emissions have fallen 87 percent, sulfur oxides (SOx) emissions have plummeted 98 percent, and nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions have dropped 57 percent.

During the same period, the Port moved more than 8.85 million twenty-foot equivalent units (TEUs), maintaining its ranking as the Western Hemisphere’s No. 1 container seaport and surpassing the Port’s earlier record of nearly 8.47 million TEUs set in 2006. The 2016 peak represents an 18 percent increase in cargo since the 2005 baseline inventory.

DPM emissions are also used to assess health risk. The Port met its 2020 goal in 2014 when it lowered DPM emissions 85 percent. With an 87 percent reduction in health risk in 2016, the Port continues to exceed its 2020 goal.

“As emissions decline and cargo throughput rises, chipping away at what’s left gets tougher,” said Port Director of Environmental Management Chris Cannon. “The 2016 report reflects tremendous strides we’ve made with the help of all our industry and community partners.”

Highlights of Results

A closer look at the numbers reveals the extent to which 2016 was a banner year for the Port’s air quality improvement gains. From 2015 to 2016 alone, pollution is down 13 percent for DPM, 10 percent for NOx and 14 percent for SOx.

On a per TEU basis, the 2016 findings are even more remarkable. For every 10,000 TEUs handled at the Port complex, DPM emissions are down 89 percent, NOx is down 63 percent, and SOx is down 98 percent. Greenhouse gas emissions (GHGs) are also at their lowest – down 28 percent – for every 10,000 TEUs.

The latest findings are based on data collected during calendar year 2016 and reviewed by regional, state and federal air regulatory agencies. The inventory is a detailed report card documenting the impact of all strategies for curbing every source of port-related emissions: ships, locomotives, trucks, cargo handling equipment and harbor craft.

Full implementation of the Port’s strategies under the San Pedro Bay Ports Clean Air Action Plan (CAAP), compliance with government air quality regulations, and improved operational efficiencies worked in concert to achieve the 2016 gains. Operational efficiencies include a chassis pool serving the entire complex, advanced planning for the largest ship calls, and additional measures that vessel operators, terminals, railroads, trucking companies and other Port partners collaborated on and adopted to prevent the congestion that slowed cargo during late 2014 and early 2015.

Substantial progress in reducing emissions from ships played a key role in the 2016 results. Factors include the ongoing trend of fewer vessel calls due to bigger ships carrying more cargo, fleet compliance with California’s shore power regulations for an entire year without congestion, and an increased use of alternative emissions capture technology when plugging into shore-side electricity is unavailable.

Increased compliance with cleaner vessel fuel regulations, continued participation in the Port’s Vessel Speed Reduction Program, and growing participation in the Port’s voluntary Environmental Ship Index program also led to clean air progress. The latter offers incentives that encourage vessel operators to bring their cleanest ships to Los Angeles and demonstrate new onboard pollution reduction technology.

Going forward, the Port is aggressively pursuing new clean air measures while cargo throughput continues to rise. The Port is continuing its focus on reducing health risk and criteria pollutant emissions, especially NOx, while increasing efforts to reduce GHGs. To accomplish this, the Port is working with its industry partners to implement near-zero and zero tailpipe emissions strategies. These include expanding demonstration projects to test zero emissions drayage trucks and launching new projects to test near-zero and zero emission yard tractors and zero emissions top handlers for which the Port has secured funding from the California Air Resources Board and the California Energy Commission.

The increased emphasis on GHG is reflected in the proposed 2017 CAAP Update, which sets new targets for reducing GHG emissions 40 percent below 1990 levels by 2030 and 80 percent below 1990 levels by 2050. A joint document of the ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach, the 2017 CAAP is available at http://www.cleanairactionplan.org for public review and comment through Sept. 18. Commissioners from both ports are slated to hold a joint meeting to consider the final version in November.

The Port of Los Angeles is America’s premier port and has a strong commitment to developing innovatively strategic and sustainable operations that benefit Southern California’s economy and quality of life. North America’s leading seaport by container volume and cargo value, the Port of Los Angeles facilitated $272 billion in trade during 2016. San Pedro Bay port complex operations and commerce facilitate one in nine jobs in the five-county Southern California region.

Online Edition

SAN PEDRO, Calif. –  The Port of Los Angeles achieved record clean air gains while moving more cargo than ever, according to the Port’s 2016 Inventory of Air Emissions. Released today, the annual report also shows the Port surpassed its 2020 goal for reducing the health risk of emissions from port-related activity.

Dec 01, 2017

Single Ship Record at los Angeles

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Not one of the worlds largest container ships, Maersk Lines' 13,492-TEU Maersk Evora nevertheless set a new container handling record at the port of Los Angeles in October when it discharged 24,846 TEUs, a new world record for a single vessel port call. All of the boxes were handled at APM Terminals' Pie 400 between October 18 and October 22, with the 366-meter vessel then proceeding on to Yokohoma, Japan.

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Not one of the worlds largest container ships, Maersk Lines' 13,492-TEU Maersk Evora nevertheless set a new container handling record at the port of Los Angeles in October when it discharged 24,846 TEUs, a new world record for a single vessel port call. All of the boxes were handled at APM Terminals' Pie 400 between October 18 and October 22, with the 366-meter vessel then proceeding on to Yokohoma, Japan.

Jan 18, 2011

TSA looks to expedite screening for air cargo on US-bound passenger planes

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The Transportation Security Administration is moving ahead, on a faster-than-expected timetable, to close a gap in security screening of international air cargo carried aboard US-bound passenger flights.

Air freight forwarders and members of the global shipping industry learned Friday that TSA appears poised to require them to screen, by year's end, 100 percent of such cargo bound for the United States. That would be two years sooner than expected.

Just last year, the TSA told Congress that screening 100 percent of international in-bound air cargo would be delayed until at least 2013. But TSA is looking to accelerate that timetable after the terrorist bombing attempt in late October, in which explosives were secreted inside printer cartridges sent from Yemen to Chicago – and were intended to blow up in cargo holds of passenger jets while they were in the air. [Editor's note: The last two paragraphs were changed post-publication to make clear that the requirement is not yet final.]

Carriers now have 45 days to comment on the proposed mandate, with TSA reviewing industry comments before it makes the rule final.

A push to screen all cargo was a response to "the latest threats and the considerable progress made by industry in screening international inbound cargo," James Fotenos, a TSA spokesman, wrote in an e-mail. "TSA’s mission is to ensure the safety of the traveling public.... After the thwarted attempt by terrorists to ship explosives aboard aircraft headed to this country last October, TSA immediately took a number of steps to enhance security by tightening existing air cargo."

Among those steps for US-bound international flights, TSA ordered a ban on any cargo designated as "high risk." Other safeguards, meanwhile, heavily restricted small packages sent by mail, which often travel in the cargo holds of passenger aircraft.

The policies, combined with bad weather, meant that some people in the US waited weeks to get their packages, especially over Christmas when there was a big jump in the amount of intercontinental mail. In some cases, the US Postal Service was forced to reroute US-bound mail, putting it on air-cargo-only flights and even ships.

"I had a batch of items sent to the US on the 26th November that took ages," wrote Chocolatecatgirl, an eBay seller in Britain who sells items in the US. "One customer got snotty after 2 weeks and I had to refund."

Delays have lessened as mail volume has dropped – and as postal systems abroad have become familiar with US requirements, say US Postal Service and air cargo experts.

But will new air freight requirements cause the same kind of disruption with air cargo that occurred with small mailed packages in December?

"TSA continues to work with the air cargo industry to implement the robust security measures with the least amount of impact on the flow of air cargo and mail inbound to the US," Mr. Fotenos wrote.

Freight forwarders, who use the cargo holds of passenger aircraft to move thousands of tons of freight each day, have long resisted a requirement of 100 percent screening, arguing that it would throw a monkey wrench into the finely tuned global supply chain.

"International aviation authorities ... suggest that screening all international cargo may not improve security and would likely cause economic damage to our slowly recovering economy," Brandon Fried, executive director of the Airforwarders Association, wrote in an e-mail. "TSA is aware of the challenges and criticisms of the Congressionally-mandated screening regime, and we are hopeful they will thoughtfully address these during the comment period.” [Editor's note: The original paragraph has been changed to make clear who suggests that comprehensive cargo screening may not improve security.]

Freight forwarders, he said, prefer "risk-based freight assessments," in which air cargo is evaluated for higher-risk items that are then screened, rather than requiring screening of all items. In November, Mr. Fried urged Congress to "reject additional calls for 100 percent screening of inbound cargo."

After 9/11, Congress approved the Aviation and Transportation Security Act of 2001. It required screening of "all passengers and property transported on passenger planes," including air cargo aboard those planes – about 7,500 tons per day.

By mid-2007, TSA had improved passenger screening but still wasn't doing the job with air cargo, the Department of Homeland Security Office of Inspector General said in a report titled "Transportation Security Administration’s Oversight of Passenger Aircraft Cargo Security Faces Significant Challenges." TSA oversight "does not provide assurance that air carriers are meeting congressionally-mandated goals," the report found. "Consequently, the process increases the opportunities for the carriage of explosives, incendiaries, and other dangerous devices on passenger aircraft."

To fix such problems, the 9/11 Commission Act of 2007 mandated that the Department of Homeland Security (TSA is an arm of DHS) physically screen at least 50 percent of passenger aircraft cargo on both domestic and incoming foreign passenger flights to the US by February 2009. All such cargo was to be screened by August 2010.

Now the 100 percent target for international incoming cargo is Dec. 31, 2011.

Of course, TSA could simply refuse admittance to flights that are not inspected to its standards. But that could also produce acute economic hardship for passengers who would have to pay more to fly to the US without the economic bonus of cargo in the hold beneath their feet.

[Editor's note: The original version of the headline and subhead was changed to reflect the fact that TSA's action is a proposal.]

Online Edition

The Transportation Security Administration is moving ahead, on a faster-than-expected timetable, to close a gap in security screening of international air cargo carried aboard US-bound passenger flights.

Air freight forwarders and members of the global shipping industry learned Friday that TSA appears poised to require them to screen, by year's end, 100 percent of such cargo bound for the United States. That would be two years sooner than expected.

Aug 01, 2016

oakland Coal Exports Blocked

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In a controversial move the Oakland City Council has voted to ban the handling and storage of coal and coke at the city’s marine handling facilities, including the proposed Oakland Global facility that would be managed by Terminal Logistics Solutions and financed by the California Capital and Investment Group. Both parties had expected to handle drybulk commodities at the terminal, to include coal and coke that would have come from mines in Utah, with that state agreeing to invest $53 million in the project for the right to export its products through California.

 

Backers of the bulk facility have since warned that there may be legal consequences from the Council’s decision, which follows an earlier decision by the Army Corps of Engineers to deny a permit for coal terminal construction at Cherry Point, Washington on the grounds that it would endanger local wildlife.

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Jul 01, 2016

Truck Replacement Program Scraps 200th Rig

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A Puget Sound incentive program that helps drayage truck owners purchase newer, lower-emission trucks to improve regional air quality recently replaced its 200th truck, the program announced in June 6.

 

The Seaport Truck Scrappage and Replacements for Air in Puget Sound 2 is a joint program of the Northwest Seaport Alliance and Puget Sound Clean Air Agency to reduce diesel particulate emissions in the region. ScRAPS 2 encourages owners to replace trucks with engines manufactured between 1994 and 2006 with newer models built to meet updated US Environmental Protection Agency standards.

 

The program reimburses eligible truck owners for part of the cost of a new truck and demolishes and recycles the older model at local vehicle recycling facilities. Truck owners who buy a truck with a model year 2010 engine or newer receive as much as $27,000 in return; a truck with a model 2007 to 2009 engine yields up to $20,000.

 

Launched in May 2014, the program was expanded earlier this month to make it easier to qualify for trucks primarily serving the NWSA’s South Harbor. Now 200 trips to either the North or South harbor qualify truck owners for the incentive program.

 

The program supports the SeaPort Alliance’s Clean Air Agency estimate that taking 200 older trucks off Puget Sound roads could result in an annual reduction of nine tons of diesel particulates and 114 tons of oxides of nitrogen.

 

The program, which says it has enough money to replace an additional 125 trucks is funded by a handful of federal agencies as well as the Washington State Department of Ecology and the Northwest Seaport Alliance, which is comprised of the ports of Seattle and Tacoma.

 

About 2,500 trucks visit Seattle and Tacoma marine terminals each day.

Print Edition

 

A Puget Sound incentive program that helps drayage truck owners purchase newer, lower-emission trucks to improve regional air quality recently replaced its 200th truck, the program announced in June 6.

 

May 16, 2016

Lawmakers pressure Port Authority to cut back on pollution

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Lawmakers pressure Port Authority to cut back on pollution | New York's PIX11 / WPIX-TV

NEWARK, N.J. — Children in Newark and Elizabeth are struggling to breathe and the air pollution is making their problems worse.

Tiyonn Bowers, 9, enjoys indoor school activities, like art or the library. He said outdoor activities make him sick and has been hospitalized and missed school because of this before.

“I don’t go outside that much,” he said.

Bowers suffers from asthma and carries a pump with him. His mother signed him up for a study that also required him to carry an air quality monitor on his waist for months.

“I prefer him not to be out there,” Tamika Bowers said.

She changed the filter on her son’s monitor daily and was shocked to see the results.

“It’s very dirty,” Bowers said.

The Bowers are among dozens participating in research by Rutgers and the Ironbound Community Corporation. They’ve partnered to study the impact of traffic pollution on asthmatic kids living in cities. The Ironbound section of Newark backs up to the ports, truck stops and trucking companies. Some kids participating in the study have repeatedly missed school because they can't go outdoors, or have been hospitalized.

According to the EPA, one in four children in Newark have asthma.

The New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection has studied air quality around the ports and found an increase in cancer risk.

Lawmakers point to trucks that do business at the ports, as a source of pollution in the community.

The Ironbound Community Corporation counted over 2,000 trucks passing schools or playgrounds within 2 hours in the Ironbound section of Newark. A spokesman pointed to a study paid for by the Port Authority that found that only 5 percent of trucks that pass through the Ironbound are port-related.

Lawmakers apparently disagree.

New Jersey State Senator Ray Lesniak introduced a bill Monday that would force trucks doing business at the ports to cut down on their emissions.

New Jersey Senators Bob Menendez, Cory Booker and New York Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand wrote a letter to the Environmental Protection Agency last week, calling for action.

"These low-income and minority communities are disproportionately exposed to high levels of air pollution resulting in serious health problems,” said the Senators letter. “Fortunately, there are proven technologies that can allow the port community to reduce and eventually eliminate diesel emissions."

Earlier this year, the Port Authority reversed its decision to retrofit or replace polluting trucks. Instead, they pledged $1.2 million to supplant 400 trucks. But critics argue that it is a pittance when compared to the amount of money the Port Authority invests in capital projects, such as upgrades to the Bayonne Bridge or LaGuardia Airport. The Port Authority will spend over $27.6 billion by 2023 on more than 500 capital projects.

“To call it an injustice doesn’t seem to give it enough weight. You really are taking away people’s right to breathe clean air,” Molly Greenberg, the Environmental Justice Policy Manager for Ironbound Community Corporation, said. “They have enough money on their own to do a lot of different repairs that benefit them."

A spokesman for the Port Authority said they have reduced port pollutants by 41.5 percent since 2006 and have invested $600 million in environmentally friendly rail facilities.

"We are firmly committed to continuing to work with the EPA and other regulators in the region to further reduce emissions from the port,” said the statement. "We applaud efforts to take a national holistic look at this issue and are open to federal regulation that would create uniform standards for port facilities across the country.”

Online Edition

Lawmakers pressure Port Authority to cut back on pollution | New York's PIX11 / WPIX-TV

NEWARK, N.J. — Children in Newark and Elizabeth are struggling to breathe and the air pollution is making their problems worse.

Tiyonn Bowers, 9, enjoys indoor school activities, like art or the library. He said outdoor activities make him sick and has been hospitalized and missed school because of this before.

“I don’t go outside that much,” he said.

Oct 24, 2016

San Diego port one of three that assists foreign partners

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The Port of San Diego is one of three ports in the nation that has partnered with a branch of the U.S. Department of State to help enhance maritime security in countries around the world.  

From Karachi, Pakistan to Kingston, Jamaica, San Diego’s port and its police agency, the Harbor Police Department, are helping foreign ports to better harness existing capabilities, share strategies and improve collaboration.

“A lot of the partners (we) work with can’t afford to buy the latest inspection technology or the latest patrol boats, but strong inter-agency coordination is really a no-cost endeavor, and you can have really strong, positive impacts on port security in that country and maritime security more broadly,” said Scott Lueders, a public affairs officer for a branch of the State Department.

The effort is part of the State Department’s ongoing mission, spearheaded by its Bureau of International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs, to diminish the illegal drug trade and instability abroad. It’s also an opportunity for countries and for individual agencies to forge relationships with international partners.

San Diego is joined by the Port of Miami and the Port of Long Beach.  

San Diego became a partner in 2015 and several months in, a five-member group from the Port of Karachi visited the Port of San Diego. 

Karachi, dubbed the Gateway to Pakistan, handles a majority of the country’s cargo, including supplies headed toward the war in Afghanistan. 

“They were very interested in port security and what are the best practices we’re using here,” said Harbor police Chief Mark Stainbrook. “What we do, how we do it, and what the results are.”

Then in February, a small Harbor police crew spent two weeks in Jamaica, traveling to more than a dozen outposts. After their visit, the Jamaican force increased its drug seizures three fold. 

The State Department official said San Diego’s experiences with the team from Karachi and in Jamaica illustrate different goals of the agency’s partnerships. 

Training provided by San Diego’s port helped Jamaican officers make the best use of equipment provided by the State Department.

The partnership helped the country increase its seizure of cocaine from 360 kilograms in all of 2015, to 876 kilograms in the first half of 2016. That’s three times larger than any other seizure total for any six-month period in the last 15 years, Stainbrook said. 

Comparatively, the benefit of a visit from a foreign country, like Pakistan, is less quantifiable - but no less valuable, he said. 

“Having strong relationships with this entity that manages this entry point is really a win-win, not only for the Pakistanis, who get to see best practices at such a high-functioning port, but also U.S. personnel stationed in Pakistan and…the port of San Diego,” said Lueders, the public affairs officer.

“The CEO of the Port of San Diego now has the Karachi Port Trust chairman’s contact details,” he said.

Ports are reimbursed for any expenses incurred while working with foreign countries. Costs associated with these missions vary. A spokeswoman for the Port of San Diego said the trip to Jamaica cost about $21,800. 

The partnership is also a professional development opportunity for local officers. 

Harbor police Sgt. Donald Brick, who was on the three-person team that headed to Jamaica, said his crew didn’t put on a formal training. Rather, they drove around the island nation and met face-to-face with Jamaican officers at their substations. The U.S. group wanted a first-hand look at what resources were available to them and what their day-to-day operation looked like. 

What they saw was eye-opening. 

“At one substation, their headquarters was half of a Conex box dropped in the middle of a dirt lot several hundred yards from the water,” Brick said. “They didn’t have electricity, they had no computer, no internet.”

The Jamaican force had just recently received a number of boats from the State Department, so part of the Harbor police crew’s visit was focused on the upkeep of those vessels. They shared maintenance schedules, repair tips and helped compile a list of much-needed tools. 

They also went over patrol strategies including tips for what to look for when scouring for smugglers. After being visited by the Harbor police team, Jamaican police logged a record number of cocaine seizures. 

“I think it’s a combination of the training and information we gave them, plus the ability to do more patrols because they had better and functioning vessels,” Brick said.

The sergeant said his team benefited from the trip as well. 

“These guys are making next to nothing, they’re going out and risking their lives on a daily basis, and doing it with a smile and a real positive work ethic,” Brick said. “For me, I brought that back. We’re well paid and have the best equipment, but sometimes our attitudes could be better. It was a nice wake up call.” 

 

Online Edition

The Port of San Diego is one of three ports in the nation that has partnered with a branch of the U.S. Department of State to help enhance maritime security in countries around the world.  

From Karachi, Pakistan to Kingston, Jamaica, San Diego’s port and its police agency, the Harbor Police Department, are helping foreign ports to better harness existing capabilities, share strategies and improve collaboration.

Apr 06, 2017

West Oakland Air Pollution Concerns Prompt Civil Rights Complaint

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OAKLAND (CBS SF) — A civil rights complaint filed this week on behalf of West Oakland residents alleges air pollution from diesel emissions at the Port of Oakland disproportionately impacts communities of color.

The residents, the complaint alleges, experience more asthma attacks, higher rates of heart failure and strokes, and can expect to live nine years less than other Californians due to reduced air quality near the Port of Oakland.

The complaint, filed under the Civil Rights Act of 1964, alleges that the City and Port of Oakland has caused “…West Oakland residents to suffer from diesel emissions that are up to 90 times higher than California’s average” and has led to West Oakland having one of the lowest life expectancies of all Oakland communities.

Environmental law firm, Earthjustice, filed the complaint on behalf of the West Oakland Environmental Indicators Project on Tuesday, stating that the poor air quality surrounding the Port of Oakland and West Oakland, which remains primarily a community of color, is largely due to the City and Port’s “failure to require either a comprehensive truck management plan, or a meaningful emission reduction plan…”

This, the complaint alleges, creates an unjustified and disproportionate negative impact on the basis of race.

Title VI of Civil Rights Act of 1964 prohibits entities receiving federal financial assistance — such as the Port and City of Oakland — from engaging in activities that subject individuals to discrimination on the basis of race, color, or national origin.

Both the City and Port have “refused to mitigate the negative air quality and resulting health impacts…caused by the continued increase in truck traffic to and from the Port,” the complaint alleges.

Earthjustice notes that more truck traffic is expected as a result of a redevelopment project at the old Oakland Army Base and Oakland Global Logistics Center.

Port of Oakland communications director Mike Zampa said in a statement to CBS San Francisco Thursday that, “The Port understands the concerns of West Oakland residents…they’re our neighbors…we breathe the same air and we want it clean, too.”

But Zampa maintains that the Port has “worked with the community, transportation partners, shippers and regulators for years to develop programs that reduce the impact of global trade on the environment.”

The Port of Oakland, Zampa said, is one of the cleanest-operating ports, with diesel emissions down 98 percent since 2005 and ship emissions down 76 percent.

But Yana Garcia, an associate attorney with Earthjustice said, “The City and Port of Oakland have consistently ignored federal protections against discrimination, leading to toxic air and unhealthy burdens for West Oakland residents.”

Garcia said Oakland’s “discriminatory pattern continues to this day and is unacceptable.”

The complaint requests the U.S. Department of Transportation and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency investigate whether the City and Port have violated Title VI of the Civil Rights Act, and if so, that the City and Port withdraw its approval of the warehouse construction project at the old Oakland Army Base and analyze the full effects the development project will have on the environment and the health of the community.

A spokesperson for the Oakland City Attorney’s Office said they are not able to comment on lawsuits until they are served and have had time to review.

Online Edition

OAKLAND (CBS SF) — A civil rights complaint filed this week on behalf of West Oakland residents alleges air pollution from diesel emissions at the Port of Oakland disproportionately impacts communities of color.

The residents, the complaint alleges, experience more asthma attacks, higher rates of heart failure and strokes, and can expect to live nine years less than other Californians due to reduced air quality near the Port of Oakland.

Aug 16, 2017

LA FLEET WEEK® 2017 SCHEDULE OF EVENTS ANNOUNCED

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SAN PEDRO, Calif. - LA Fleet Week® 2017 returns to the LA Waterfront this Labor Day Weekend with a full line-up of entertainment, new attractions and friendly competitive events. With even more planned for the Monday holiday this year, the four-day event’s action-packed schedule has just been released at www.lafleetweek.com.

“This year’s LA Fleet Week has something for everyone to enjoy,” said Jonathan Williams, executive director of the LA Fleet Week Foundation. “We’ve also added many new attractions on the Labor Day holiday so that families can come to the LA Waterfront and make a full day of it.”

The San Pedro Historic Business District officially kicks off festivities Wednesday, Aug. 30 at 6 p.m. with a Hollywood-themed welcome party in downtown San Pedro. Free and open to the public, the party will celebrate the thousands of active service members from the visiting military ships arriving throughout the week.

In line with its mission to honor the nation’s military, this year’s LA Fleet Week will feature even more military equipment displays and demonstrations than last year’s inaugural event. There will also be a U.S. Bank Veterans Village, Sailor Bar on the Battleship IOWA, and aerial search-and-rescue demonstrations throughout the weekend. Free public tours of visiting military ships will take place daily, but available only on a limited, first-come, first-serve basis for those without previously booked online reservations.

New this year will be displays and booths highlighting first responders and emergency/disaster preparedness at the LA Fleet Week “Humanitarian Village.” Participants include the Los Angeles Emergency Management Division, Los Angeles Police Department, MySafeLA, and Team Rubicon USA, a disaster response veterans service organization. Returning by popular demand will also be the STEM Expo, an interactive and fun way to expose children of all ages to science, technology, engineering, and math.

A two-day rivalry basketball tournament between the City of Los Angeles and U.S. Military presented by Ariza Elevated Game Awards is slated for Saturday and Sunday, which is free and open to the public. For the Labor Day Monday holiday, organizers have added a full day of activities, starting first with the “Conquer the Bridge” race across the Vincent Thomas Bridge and a celebratory Victory breakfast for race participants. Later in the afternoon, a ‘Galley Wars’ culinary competition among cooks representing the U.S. Navy, U.S. Coast Guard, U.S. Marine Corps and Royal Canadian Navy, which is also free and open to the public. The cook-off judging panel includes celebrity chefs Robert Irvine, Mei Lin, and Steve Samson. After an evening of popular tribute bands, British rockers The Babys take the main stage to close out the four-day celebration.

Throughout the weekend, LA Fleet Week will also feature free performances by a variety of entertainers and musical acts, including the Bob Hope USO. Other evening headliners include rock band Quiet Riot, followed by Grammy award-winning Los Lobos on Friday. Saturday night’s concert will feature rocker Vince Neil, lead vocalist of Mötley Crüe, followed by a fireworks display presented by the Annenberg Foundation. Country rockers Shannon Rae and Brent Payne take the main stage on Sunday night.

LA Fleet Week is a U.S. Navy, U.S. Marine Corps and U.S. Coast Guard tradition, in which active military ships recently deployed overseas dock in a variety of major cities for one week. In November 2015, Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti, U.S. Navy officials and the Port of Los Angeles announced that Los Angeles had been selected as an official Fleet Week market for the U.S. Navy.  Last year’s inaugural event drew more than 200,000 people.

LA Fleet Week major sponsors include American Airlines, Andeavor, The Annenberg Foundation, Bob Hope USO, Clyde & Company, Delta Airlines, East West Bank, F&M Bank, Liberty Creek Wines, NBCUniversal, UPS and US Bank.  Providing overall leadership and guidance for the event is the LA Fleet Week Leadership Council, comprised of community leaders in various sectors who are dedicated to supporting and advancing the mission of the annual LA Fleet Week event. 

In addition to the LA Fleet Week website where visitors can get event information and sign up for email updates, event developments are also being announced on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter as @LAFleetWeek, or can be tracked on social media using #LAFleetWeek2017.

Online Edition

SAN PEDRO, Calif. - LA Fleet Week® 2017 returns to the LA Waterfront this Labor Day Weekend with a full line-up of entertainment, new attractions and friendly competitive events. With even more planned for the Monday holiday this year, the four-day event’s action-packed schedule has just been released at www.lafleetweek.com.