METRANS UTC

Sustainable and Affordable Housing Near Rail Transit: Refining and Expanding a Scenario Planning Tool

Project Number

16-07

Project Summary

Affordable housing and climate change have become urgent issues in cities across the United States. Evidence from our previous research in Los Angeles showed that promoting transit-oriented development (TOD) to achieve greenhouse gas (GHG) emission reduction could be at odds with providing access to affordable housing near transit, because higher income households tend to reduce driving the most when living near transit. Results from that study show how both goals can be met through development that favors density over inclusionary zoning. These results, however, had limited implications due to three factors: household vehicle miles travelled (VMT) was a proxy for GHG emissions, the results cannot be generalized beyond Los Angeles, and residential self-selection could hamper our estimates of household VMT. This research project will address all three of these limitations through improvements to our existing model.

Project Status

In progress

Year

2016

Topic Area

Integrated Freight and Passenger Systems

P.I. Name & Address

Professor, Sol Price School of Public Policy
University of Southern California
650 Childs Way
Ralph and Goldy Lewis Hall 201C
Los Angeles, CA 90089-0626
United States
bostic@usc.edu

Co-P.I.

Senior Associate Dean, Academic Affairs; Professor & Director of Graduate Programs in Urban Planning, Sol Price School of Public Policy
University of Southern California
650 Childs Way
Ralph and Goldy Lewis Hall (RGL) 301C
Los Angeles, CA 90089-0626
United States
boarnet@usc.edu

Funding Source(s) and
Amounts Provided (by each agency or organization)

 

Total Project Cost

 

Agency ID or Contract Number

 

Start and End Dates

 

Brief Description of
Research Project

Affordable housing and climate change have become urgent issues in cities across the United States. Evidence from our previous research in Los Angeles showed that promoting transit-oriented development (TOD) to achieve greenhouse gas (GHG) emission reduction could be at odds with providing access to affordable housing near transit, because higher income households tend to reduce driving the most when living near transit. Results from that study show how both goals can be met through development that favors density over inclusionary zoning. These results, however, had limited implications due to three factors: household vehicle miles travelled (VMT) was a proxy for GHG emissions, the results cannot be generalized beyond Los Angeles, and residential self-selection could hamper our estimates of household VMT. This research project will address all three of these limitations through improvements to our existing model.

Describe Implementation of Research Outcomes (or why not implemented)

 

Impacts/Benefits of Implementation (actual, not anticipated)

 

Web Links, Reports, Project website